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The American Intelligence: How It Works

The American Intelligence How It Works : Section 702
Learn more about the American Intelligence written by Jacques Gascuel, inventor of sensitive data safety and security systems, for Freemindtronic. This article may be updated on this subject.

The American intelligence: a paradox

The American intelligence is powerful and influential, but also faces limits and challenges. Discover how it works, what are its consequences, and how to protect yourself from it.

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The American Intelligence: How It Works, Its Limits and Consequences

The American intelligence is one of the most powerful and influential in the world. It has a vast network of agencies, resources, and allies that enable it to collect, analyze, and act on information of strategic interest. However, the American intelligence also faces challenges and criticisms, both internally and externally. In this article, we will explore how the American intelligence works, what are its limits, and what are the consequences of its actions for the global security and privacy.

How the American Intelligence Works

The American intelligence is composed of 18 agencies that form the Intelligence Community (IC). These agencies are divided into two categories: the civilian agencies, which are under the supervision of the Director of National Intelligence (DNI), and the military agencies, which are under the supervision of the Secretary of Defense.

The main civilian agencies are:

  • The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), which is responsible for collecting, analyzing, and disseminating foreign intelligence, as well as conducting covert operations and paramilitary activities.
  • The National Security Agency (NSA), which is responsible for collecting, processing, and disseminating signals intelligence (SIGINT), as well as conducting cyber operations and protecting the US government’s communications and information systems.
  • The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), which is responsible for collecting, analyzing, and disseminating domestic intelligence, as well as conducting counterintelligence, counterterrorism, and law enforcement activities.
  • The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), which is responsible for collecting, analyzing, and disseminating geospatial intelligence (GEOINT), which includes imagery, maps, and other geographic information.
  • The National Reconnaissance Office (NRO), which is responsible for designing, launching, and operating reconnaissance satellites and other space-based systems that provide intelligence to the IC and the Department of Defense (DoD).
  • The Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), which is responsible for overseeing, coordinating, and integrating the activities of the IC, as well as providing strategic guidance and support to the DNI.

The main military agencies are:

  • The Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA), which is responsible for providing military intelligence to the DoD and the IC, as well as conducting human intelligence (HUMINT), counterintelligence, and defense attaché activities.
  • The National Security Agency/Central Security Service (NSA/CSS), which is responsible for providing SIGINT and cyber support to the DoD and the IC, as well as conducting information assurance and cryptologic activities.
  • The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), which is responsible for providing GEOINT support to the DoD and the IC, as well as conducting geospatial analysis and mapping activities.
  • The National Reconnaissance Office (NRO), which is responsible for providing space-based intelligence support to the DoD and the IC, as well as conducting satellite reconnaissance and surveillance activities.
  • The Military Intelligence Corps (MI), which is responsible for providing tactical and operational intelligence to the Army and the joint force, as well as conducting HUMINT, SIGINT, GEOINT, and counterintelligence activities.
  • The Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI), which is responsible for providing maritime intelligence to the Navy and the joint force, as well as conducting HUMINT, SIGINT, GEOINT, and counterintelligence activities.
  • The Marine Corps Intelligence Activity (MCIA), which is responsible for providing intelligence to the Marine Corps and the joint force, as well as conducting HUMINT, SIGINT, GEOINT, and counterintelligence activities.
  • The Air Force Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Agency (AFISRA), which is responsible for providing intelligence to the Air Force and the joint force, as well as conducting HUMINT, SIGINT, GEOINT, and counterintelligence activities.

The American intelligence works by collecting information from various sources, such as human sources, signals, images, open sources, and others. It then analyzes this information to produce intelligence products, such as reports, assessments, briefings, and forecasts. These products are then disseminated to the relevant consumers, such as the President, the Congress, the military, the policy makers, and the allies. The American intelligence also acts on the information it collects, by conducting operations, such as covert actions, cyber attacks, drone strikes, and special operations.

The Limits of the American Intelligence

The American intelligence, despite its capabilities and resources, is not omnipotent or infallible. It faces several limits and challenges, such as:

  • Legal and ethical limits: The American intelligence is bound by the laws and regulations of the US and the international community, as well as by the values and principles of the American democracy. It must respect the rights and liberties of the American citizens and the foreign nationals, as well as the sovereignty and interests of the other countries. It must also abide by the oversight and accountability mechanisms of the executive, the legislative, and the judicial branches, as well as the public opinion and the media. The American intelligence must balance its need for secrecy and effectiveness with its duty for transparency and legitimacy.
  • Technical and operational limits: The American intelligence is limited by the availability and reliability of the information it collects, as well as by the accuracy and timeliness of the analysis it produces. It must deal with the challenges of information overload, data quality, data security, data privacy, and data sharing. It must also cope with the threats and risks of cyber attacks, counterintelligence, deception, and denial. The American intelligence must balance its need for innovation and adaptation with its need for standardization and coordination.
  • Strategic and political limits: The American intelligence is limited by the complexity and uncertainty of the global environment, as well as by the diversity and dynamism of the actors and issues it faces. It must deal with the challenges of globalization, multipolarity, regionalization, and fragmentation. It must also cope with the threats and opportunities of terrorism, proliferation, rogue states, failed states, and emerging powers. The American intelligence must balance its need for anticipation and prevention with its need for reaction and intervention.

The Consequences of the American Intelligence

The American intelligence has significant consequences for the global security and privacy, both positive and negative, such as:

  • Positive consequences: The American intelligence contributes to the protection and promotion of the national security and interests of the US and its allies, as well as to the maintenance and enhancement of the international peace and stability. It provides valuable information and insights to the decision makers and the operators, as well as to the public and the media. It also conducts effective operations and actions to deter, disrupt, or defeat the adversaries and the threats. The American intelligence plays a key role in the global intelligence cooperation and coordination, as well as in the global governance and leadership.
  • Negative consequences: The American intelligence also poses risks and challenges to the security and privacy of the US and its allies, as well as to the international order and norms. It may collect, analyze, or disseminate information that is inaccurate, incomplete, or biased, leading to errors, failures, or controversies. It may also conduct operations or actions that are illegal, unethical, or counterproductive, leading to violations, scandals, or backlashes. The American intelligence may face competition or conflict with the other intelligence services or actors, as well as with the other stakeholders or interests.

Section 702 of FISA: A Surveillance Without Control

  • On July 17, 2008, the US Congress passed section 702 of the FISA (Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act), which authorizes the US intelligence agencies to collect the electronic communications of non-Americans located abroad, without a warrant from the FISA judge.
  • On January 19, 2018, the US Congress extended section 702 of FISA until December 31, 2023, without making any substantial changes.
  • On March 22, 2023, the US Congress extended section 702 of FISA again until April 19, 2024, without making any significant changes.
  • On December 16, 2023, the US Congress approved the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), which included a four-month extension of section 702 of FISA, avoiding its expiration at the end of the year.

The Violation of the Right to Privacy

  • On June 5, 2013, the whistleblower Edward Snowden revealed the existence of the PRISM program, which allowed the US intelligence agencies to access the data of the users of the main electronic service providers, such as Google, Facebook, Microsoft or Apple.
  • On October 6, 2015, the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) invalidated the Safe Harbor, an agreement that allowed the transfer of personal data between the European Union and the United States, considering that it did not offer an adequate level of protection.
  • On July 16, 2020, the CJEU invalidated the Privacy Shield, the successor of the Safe Harbor, for the same reasons, considering that the risk of interference by the US intelligence services in the transferred data was incompatible with the respect of the fundamental rights of the persons concerned.
  • On July 31, 2023, the CJEU issued a ruling that confirmed the invalidity of the Privacy Shield and imposed strict conditions for the transfer of personal data to third countries, especially the United States, under the standard contractual clauses (SCCs) or the binding corporate rules (BCRs).

The Legal and Political Consequences

  • On October 24, 2013, the European Parliament adopted a resolution that condemned the massive surveillance activities of the US intelligence services and called for the suspension of the cooperation agreements on security and counter-terrorism.
  • On October 23, 2015, the European Parliament adopted another resolution that requested the creation of an independent international tribunal to examine the complaints of the European citizens regarding the surveillance of the US intelligence services.
  • On September 14, 2018, the European Parliament adopted a third resolution that called for the suspension of the Privacy Shield, due to the non-compliance of the commitments made by the United States on the protection of personal data.
  • On August 31, 2023, the European Parliament adopted a fourth resolution that asked the European Commission to propose a new legislation on the protection of personal data in the context of cross-border data flows, which would guarantee a level of protection equivalent to that of the general data protection regulation (GDPR).

Sources:

Congress passes temporary extension of FISA Section 702 surveillance program – Axios:

The Court of Justice invalidates Decision 2016/1250 on the adequacy of the protection provided by the EU-US Data Protection Shield:

FISA Section 702: What it is and why Congress is debating it – NBC News

New technologies and products that limit the possibilities of intelligence

Facing the capabilities of collection and analysis of the American intelligence, which threaten the privacy and sovereignty of individuals and countries, there are new technologies and products that allow to limit the possibilities of intelligence. These technologies and products use techniques of encryption, cryptography, blockchain or NFC to protect personal data and electronic communications. They offer an alternative to traditional solutions, which are often vulnerable to attacks or interceptions by the American intelligence. Among these technologies and products, we can mention:

  • EviCypher NFC HSM and EviCypher HSM OpenPGP, which are patented technologies in the United States in the field of cybersecurity developed by Freemindtronic SL Andorra, used in counter-espionage products such as DataShielder Defense. They allow to encrypt and decrypt data without contact, thanks to hardware security modules that use NFC technology. They offer compatibility with OpenPGP standards, operating without server, without database, with a very high level of flexibility from different removable, fixed and online and offline storage media including NFC HSM.
  • DataShielder DefenseDataShielder Defense, which is a counter-espionage product developed by Freemindtronic SL Andorra, which uses EviCore NFC HSM and EviCore HSM OpenPGP technologies to encrypt and decrypt all types of data and communication services. This product protects sovereign communications, by preventing the American intelligence from accessing personal, professional or state secrets. It also guarantees the sovereignty of users, by making their data anonymous and inviolable.
  • Signal, which is an instant messaging application that uses the Signal protocol, which is an end-to-end encryption protocol that ensures the confidentiality and integrity of messages. This application allows to communicate anonymously and securely, by avoiding the surveillance or censorship of the American intelligence.
  • Tor, which is a decentralized network that uses volunteer relays to route Internet traffic anonymously and encrypted. This network allows to browse the web without leaving traces, by hiding the IP address and location of users. It also allows to access hidden websites, which are not indexed by search engines.

These technologies and products represent examples of innovative solutions that limit the possibilities of the American intelligence and preserve the individual and collective sovereignty. They also illustrate the issues and challenges related to the use of digital technologies in the field of intelligence.

Conclusion

The American intelligence is a complex and dynamic phenomenon that has a significant impact on the world. It has many strengths and weaknesses, as well as many opportunities and threats. It has many achievements and failures, as well as many benefits and costs. It is a source of both security and insecurity, both privacy and surveillance. It is a subject of both admiration and criticism, both cooperation and confrontation. The American intelligence is a paradox that requires a careful and balanced approach.

Ommic case: How a French company allegedly handed over military secrets to China and Russia

Ommic case: The story of a French semiconductor company accused of spying for China and Russia

Ommic case by Jacques Gascuel: This article will be updated with any new information on the topic.  

Ommic case: A scandal of military industrial espionage

Ommic, a French semiconductor company, suspected of spying for China and Russia. Alleged delivery of military material and processes for radars, missiles or drones. Economic and political consequences for France and Europe. Questions about the protection and control of dual-use technologies. Article on the Ommic case, the technological secrets, the measures taken by the French government and other cases of military industrial espionage in the world.

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Ommic case: The story of a French semiconductor company accused of spying for China and Russia

The Ommic case is a scandal of industrial espionage that involves a French company specialized in the manufacture of high-tech semiconductors. According to the charges brought by the French justice, Ommic would have delivered to China and Russia material and processes sensitive to the military, used in particular by the French army. The French general manager of the company, as well as three other people, were indicted in March 2023 for “delivery to a foreign power of processes, documents or files likely to harm the fundamental interests of the Nation”. The French state took temporary control of the company and seized several tens of millions of euros. In June 2023, Ommic was sold to an American owner and changed its name to Macom. This case raises questions about the protection of French technological know-how and the risks associated with the transfer of strategic technologies to foreign powers.

What is Ommic?

Ommic, located near Paris in Limeil-Brévannes, has a history of more than 40 years in material science, semiconductor wafer processing and monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) design. Its differentiated manufacturing capabilities include several semiconductor processes and products qualified by the European Space Agency (ESA). Ommic uses notably gallium arsenide (GaAs) and gallium nitride (GaN) technologies, which allow to produce high-performance electronic components for high-frequency applications. Ommic counts among its customers major players in the space sector, such as Thales Alenia Space or Airbus Defence and Space.

Why did Macom buy Ommic?

Macom is an American supplier of semiconductor products for the telecommunications, industrial and defense and data center sectors. Macom announced in February 2023 that it had entered into a definitive agreement to acquire the assets and operations of Ommic for approximately 38.5 million euros. Macom sees Ommic’s high-frequency MMIC product portfolio and design capability as an aid to address microwave applications on target markets. Macom also said that acquiring Ommic should allow it to focus more on European markets and expand its wafer production capacity.

What are the technological secrets delivered by Ommic?

According to the information revealed by the French press, Ommic would have delivered to China and Russia material and processes sensitive to the military, which could have been used to manufacture radars, missiles or drones. These would include machine tools capable of engraving GaN wafers, a highly sought-after technology for its performance in terms of power, efficiency and thermal resistance. Ommic would also have transmitted digital files containing integrated circuit plans, source codes or algorithms. These technological secrets would have an estimated value of several hundred million euros.

What are the consequences of the Ommic case?

The Ommic case had legal, economic and political consequences. On the legal level, four people were indicted and placed under judicial control. They face 15 years in prison and 225 000 euros fine.

On the economic level, the French state took temporary control of the company. It also seized several tens of millions of euros. Moreover, it launched an audit to assess the damage to national defense. Additionally, it strengthened the security and competitiveness of the French semiconductor industry.

On the political level, the Ommic case provoked contrasting reactions. Some denounced a national betrayal and a threat to technological sovereignty. Others minimized the scandal and welcomed the takeover by Macom. The French government affirmed its vigilance and reminded that France had other leading players in this field.

The Ommic case also had implications for the world of semiconductors. This is a strategic sector for many applications. The case revealed the vulnerability of some European companies to foreign espionage and competition. The case also highlighted the importance of protecting intellectual property rights and preventing technology transfers. The case also raised questions about Macom’s role and responsibility.

How did Macom react to the Ommic case?

Macom reacted to the Ommic case by expressing its support for the French authorities and its commitment to comply with all applicable laws and regulations. Macom stated that it was not aware of any wrongdoing by Ommic or its employees before or during the acquisition process. Macom also stated that it had conducted a thorough due diligence on Ommic’s business and operations before closing the deal. Macom said that it was cooperating fully with the French authorities and that it was confident that it would be able to demonstrate its good faith and integrity.

Macom also tried to reassure its customers and partners about its ability to continue to provide high-quality products and services based on Ommic’s technologies. Macom said that it had taken steps to ensure the continuity of Ommic’s operations and to preserve its know-how and expertise. Macom also said that it had implemented strict security measures to protect Ommic’s intellectual property and trade secrets from unauthorized access or disclosure.

Macom also emphasized the strategic value of acquiring Ommic for its growth and innovation objectives. Macom said that Ommic’s high-frequency MMIC product portfolio and design capability were complementary to its own offerings and would enable it to address microwave applications on target markets. Macom also said that acquiring Ommic would allow it to focus more on European markets and to expand its wafer production capacity.

Are these measures enough to ensure the security and competitiveness of France in the field of semiconductors?

According to experts, these measures are necessary but not sufficient. It would also be necessary to strengthen European cooperation, which is essential to cope with global competition, especially from China and the United States. It would also be necessary to anticipate technological changes and market needs, which are constantly changing. It would finally be necessary to develop a coherent and ambitious industrial and commercial strategy, which values the assets and specificities of France.

What are the challenges and opportunities that arise for the future?

The challenges are numerous, but so are the opportunities. The field of semiconductors is indeed a key sector for many applications, such as aeronautics, automotive, space, health or digital. The global demand is strong and should continue to grow in the coming years. France has recognized skills and innovative players in this field, who can differentiate themselves by their quality, reliability or performance. France can therefore play a major role in the development and dissemination of tomorrow’s technologies.

What are some other examples of military industrial espionage cases in the world?

Military industrial espionage is the practice of spying on or stealing information from other countries or companies that are involved in the development, production, or sale of military equipment, technology, or services. Military industrial espionage can have serious consequences for national security, economic competitiveness, and international relations.

There are many examples of military industrial espionage cases in the world, involving different actors, methods, and targets. Here are some of them:

  • In 2019, a former engineer at Raytheon, a US defense contractor, was arrested and charged with exporting sensitive missile technology to China. Wei Sun, a Chinese-born US citizen, admitted that he took a laptop containing classified information about Raytheon’s products to China without authorization. He also admitted that he shared some of the information with Chinese professors and students at a university in China1.
  • In 2018, a former employee of the French aerospace company Thales was convicted of spying for China. Henri Dumoulin, a French citizen, was accused of passing confidential documents about radar systems and missile guidance to Chinese intelligence agents. He was sentenced to six years in prison and fined 40,000 euros2.
  • In 2017, a former employee of the German engineering company Siemens was found guilty of selling trade secrets to Russia. Evgeny Kaspersky, a Russian citizen, worked as a software developer at Siemens and had access to the source code of a software used to control gas turbines. He copied the code and sold it to a Russian company that was linked to the Russian military. He was sentenced to two years and nine months in prison3.
  • In 2016, a former employee of the British defense company BAE Systems was arrested and charged with attempting to sell jet fighter secrets to Iran. Simon Finch, a British citizen, worked as a software engineer at BAE Systems and had access to sensitive information about the Typhoon fighter jet. He allegedly tried to sell the information to Iranian officials through an encrypted messaging app. He was later acquitted after claiming that he acted out of frustration over his treatment by BAE Systems.

How to prevent and combat military industrial espionage?

Military industrial espionage is a widespread and dangerous phenomenon for the security and competitiveness of countries and companies involved in the military industry. It involves spying or stealing sensitive information or technology for military purposes. Therefore, it is important to implement effective measures to prevent and combat this type of espionage. These measures may include:

  • Strengthening the protection and control of classified or proprietary information and technology.
  • Enhancing the awareness and education of employees and contractors about the risks and responsibilities.
  • Increasing the cooperation and coordination among national and international authorities and partners.
  • Prosecuting and sanctioning those who engage in or facilitate military industrial espionage.

The Ommic case is not an isolated case of military industrial espionage in the world. There are many cases where countries or companies have tried to appropriate or transfer sensitive information or technology. Some of these technologies are dual-use, meaning that they can have both civilian and military applications. This is the case for data encryption and messaging.

The complexity and dynamics of industrial espionage with a military character

Industrial espionage with a military character is a complex and dynamic phenomenon, which evolves according to technological advances, geopolitical power relations and the strategies of the actors involved. It poses significant challenges for the security and competitiveness of countries and companies that are victims or targets of this practice. It therefore requires constant vigilance and continuous adaptation to prevent and combat this threat.

The Ommic case is a concrete and recent example of industrial espionage with a military character that illustrates one of the methods that this practice can take. It also shows the flaws and risks associated with dual-use technologies, i.e. technologies that can have both civilian and military applications. It invites us to think about the future prospects and challenges posed by industrial espionage with a military character in an increasingly connected and competitive world.

Conclusion: The Ommic case and the challenges of industrial espionage with a military character

Industrial espionage with a military character is a complex and dynamic phenomenon, which evolves according to technological advances, geopolitical power relations and the strategies of the actors involved. It poses significant challenges for the security and competitiveness of countries and companies that are victims or targets of this type of espionage. It therefore requires constant vigilance and continuous adaptation to prevent and combat this threat.

In this article, we have presented the Ommic case, a scandal of industrial espionage with a military character that involves a French company specialized in the manufacture of high-performance electronic components for high-frequency applications. We have explained the facts, the actors, the stakes and the consequences of this case. We have also shown how this case illustrates one form of industrial espionage with a military character by transfer, according to the means and methods used. In the next article, we will address other methods such as infiltration, surveillance, hacking, subversion.

In the next article, we will also talk about the counter-espionage technologies such as those designed, developed and manufactured by Freemindtronic, which include innovative digital security solutions based on quantum cryptography. These solutions allow to protect sensitive data from theft, falsification or corruption, using unbreakable encryption keys and tamper-proof transactions.

We will explain how these solutions can help countries and companies to protect themselves from attacks of industrial espionage with a military character, using cutting-edge and environmentally friendly technologies.

If you want to learn more about how to protect your data and communication from industrial espionage with a military character, stay tuned for our next article on Freemindtronic’s innovative solutions based on quantum cryptography. 

EviStealth Technology at Eurosatory 2022

evistealth FOMEC FFOMECBLOT Camouflage Furtif Anonymat
EviStealth logo color svg

EviStealth, its exhibition at Eurosatory 2022

EviStealth stealth data exchange

EviStealth

1

Anonymization

Stealth system to transmit sensitive data with a click from a phone

2

Without compromises

Encrypted data exchange without risk of compromise

3

Untraceable

Leaves no trace in computer and telephone systems

About the event

Eurosatory, Paris, Hall 5B booth C178 from June 13th to June 17th 2022: Freemindtronic will present for the very first time its EviStealth technology. It offers users many usage possibilities from smartphone devices, such as the camera, the microphone, the gyroscope, the GPS, the digital fingerprint, as well as NFC’s means of communication, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi and GSM. The sender transmits, instantly and without leaving any traces, different types of encrypted data (photo, video, text, sound) with the keys of the recipients stealthily, anonymously and secured.

Press Release

The Andorran start-up Freemindtronic Ltd., conceiver and creator of security, cyber-security and counterespionage systems is also specialised in contactless technology (NFC).

The chosen logo for the new technological milestone shows the idea of the solution. Indeed, the Megascops, also named scops owl, is a master in the art of camouflage.

 The solution is mainly designed to significantly limit the risk for senders to be compromised and/or the recipients, as well as of the sensitive data transfer.

Press Release
evistealth FOMEC FFOMECBLOT Camouflage Furtif Anonymat

The solution is mainly designed to significantly limit the risk for senders to be compromised and/or the recipients, as well as of the sensitive data transfer.

EviStealth possesses different anonymization implementations such as taking pictures through the digital fingerprint of the smartphone. Therefore, it is the user’s experience that is at the heart of this innovation.

DISCRETION, SIMPLICITY AND QUICK USAGE OF THE SOLUTION IN ONE CLICK

1 ) The discretion is shown, for instance, thanks to the possibility to take pictures while faking that you are making a phone call. The sender has, to do this, a function that is shown on the screen darkened by a discreet framing viewer with the telephone placed close to the ear.

2) The simplicity is found in the different stages of the solution. The sender sends, by a simple click, his encryption key to the recipient, who adds it to his phone in one click. Then, the recipient is authenticated. The recipient’s encription key can also be added via a Freemindtronic’s contactless NFC device.

Press Release

The recipients, as well as the senders, have different possibilities to store their encryption and decryption keys. They can be stored and encrypted in the EviStealth application or in an NFC device. For this latter, the physical externalization of the keys grealtly increases the anonymity, the stealth and the reduction of some compromising risks.

Any transferred data is stored neither on the sender’s phone, nor on the recipient’s one. The data are stored encrypted in a server, temporary or permanently.

3 / Untraceable: Quick usage is crucial. The sender stealthily takes a photo and transfers it instantly to an authenticated recipient, without leaving digital traces, neither in the sender’s system, nor in the recipient’s computer system.

You will understand it with the EviStealth solution, transfer videos, audio messages or photos without leaving any trace, from your phone to your recipient’s phone.

Contact for a meeting on the Freemindtronic stand at Eurosatory

Press release

Multi-language download links for press releases.

Freemindtronic at Eurosatory 2022

Where to find us at Eurosatory 2022

CP EviStealth download links

Links exhibtion EviStealth at Eurosatory 2022: